The Transaction Project,
blown glass in printed ceramics

Apprenticeship, reputation, recommendation, skill and status; The Transaction Project takes these aspects of craft as the basis for a network of production. Building on two years of investigation, the project brings together the work of ceramicist Jonathan Keep, artist researcher Charles Stern and design studio Unfold. Working with a technique that applies 3D printing to the problem of ceramic and glass compatibility, the group has created an iterative process that allows for rapid testing of materials and form. The results are composite objects that possess integrity toward handmade and digital skills.

date

December 15th 2014
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Set of free blown vases
fig. 01

Set of free blown vases

Set of free blown vases
fig. 02

Set of free blown vases

Turbine,-blown in moulds
fig. 03

Turbine,
blown in moulds

Jug and vase
fig. 04

Jug and vase

Steel blue glass in-iron oxide clay
fig. 05

Steel blue glass in
iron oxide clay

Jonathan Keep and-Dries Verbruggen
fig. 06

Jonathan Keep and
Dries Verbruggen

Ceramic 3D printing
fig. 07

Ceramic 3D printing

3D prints drying
fig. 08

3D prints drying

3D printed ceramic
fig. 09

3D printed ceramic

Jonathan Keep
fig. 10

Jonathan Keep

Blowing glass in-3D printed ceramics
fig. 11

Blowing glass in
3D printed ceramics

Charles Stern and-Björn Friborg
fig. 12

Charles Stern and
Björn Friborg

Björn Friborg at work
fig. 13

Björn Friborg at work

Reheat and open
fig. 14

Reheat and open

Team discussion
fig. 15

Team discussion

First stage results
fig. 16

First stage results

Assorted experiments
fig. 17

Assorted experiments